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The Holy Eucharist and Auricular Confession, a Defence of Church Principles, a Laymen (G.W. Hunter). by George W. Hunter

The Holy Eucharist and Auricular Confession, a Defence of Church Principles,

a Laymen (G.W. Hunter). by George W. Hunter

Published February 5th 2012
ISBN : 9781150033308
Paperback
106 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879. Excerpt: ... HOLY EUCHARIST. We are likewiseMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879. Excerpt: ... HOLY EUCHARIST. We are likewise obliged hereunto in point of interest. The benefits which we. expect to be derived and assured to us by this Sacrament are all the blessings of the New Covenant, the forgiveness of our sins, the grace and assistance of Gods Holy Spirit, to enable us to perform the conditions of this covenant required on our part: and the comforts of Gods Holy Spirit to encourage us in well-doing, and to support us under sufferings- and the glorious reward of eternal life. So that in neglecting this Sacrament we neglect our own interest and happiness, we forsake our own mercies, and judge ourselves unworthy of all the blessings of the Gospel, and deprive ourselves of one of the best means and advantages of confirming and conveying these blessings to us. So that if we had not a due sense of our duty, the consideration of our own interest should oblige us not to neglect so excellent and so effectual a means of promoting our own comfort and happiness. William Wake, Archbishop of Canterbury 1716, is best known in this country by his translation of the Apostolic fathers, which has been often reprinted here. The copy I have was published at Hartford, 1834. His biographer says of him: Although on principle averse to the proposed abolition of the Test acts, yet his liberality towards dissenters from the Church, and his earnest endeavours to effect a union between the Churches of England and France, were deserving as much of praise as they produced him vituperation from those who either misunderstood, or wilfully misrepresented his motives and conduct. His controversial writings, which are numerous, though nervously written, betray no acrimony- the principal of these are his reply to the celebrated Bossuet, &c. &c. His tracts against Bossuet ...